Act Three, Scene One: Found– one Antipholus of Ephesus

Didn’t finish Act Three yesterday.

A day off got in the way, as did last night’s trip to Thousand Oaks to see the Kingsmen Shakespeare Festival‘s production of Macbeth at Cal Lutheran University… it was great to spend some time with great friends and great drama under the stars.  The production was very good, the lead excellent, and the experience great… I’m planning a review as a podcast.  If I can get off my butt and write it today, I’ll record and release it tomorrow (but today’s holiday may get in the way!).

But Act Three, Scene One…

We finally meet Antipholus of Ephesus (AE)… and sure enough, Luciana was right, he was with some other businessmen (Balthasar the merchant and Angelo the goldsmith).  They arrive at AE’s home and knock to be welcomed, but they are locked out by the servants (under orders of Adriana, one presumes).  MWE* when DS and DE argue some through the locked and solid (not-see-through) door.  AE decides to force his way in, only to have Balthasar advise “patience” (III.i.85); making a scene, he suggests will do AE’s reputation in the city no good whatsoever.  AE is convinced, but won’t go without some retribution… he

know(s) a wench of excellent discourse,
Pretty and witty; wild, and yet, too, gentle:
There will we dine. This woman that I mean,
My wife--but, I protest, without desert--
Hath oftentimes upbraided me withal:
To her will we to dinner.

— III.i.109-114

He knows a woman (a courtesan … look it up, people), one about whom his wife has given him some grief in the past, and he is going to take his friends there for lunch.  And to “spite (his) wife” (III.i.118) even further, he will present to her a gold chain he has commissioned from Angelo (a goldsmith, remember).  And though he knows “this jest shall cost (him) some expense” (III.i.123), both in his relationship to Adriana (and monetarily, one presumes), he’s willing to push the joke.

Much wackiness will ensue…

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