Podcast 158: The Winter’s Tale — bawdy and videos [EXPLICIT]

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This week’s podcast continues our two-month discussion of The Winter’s Tale. We’re going to discuss bawdy in the play, then review some of the videos available.

Continue reading Podcast 158: The Winter’s Tale — bawdy and videos [EXPLICIT]

The Winter’s Tale: That final scene

In the past, I’ve discussed the two scenes that are the bane of any director taking on The Winter’s Tale: the first scene in Bohemia, during which Antigonus must exit pursued by a bear, and the final revelation of Hermione. There is this wonderful ambiguity in that last one. Is her revival a miracle, a statue coming to life, or has she been alive all this time? Most productions that I’ve seen have gone the miracle route (though I have a hunch last year’s OSF production was trying to get it both ways).

But the more I look at it, I’m not sure there are two ways.

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Indoor/Outdoor and out of my head

Yesterday, I talked a bit (and a bit scatteredly) on some of the dualities and opposites in The Winter’s Tale. One such subject was the idea that the first half of the play (save for the last, pivotal scene on the Bohemian seacoast) was in the Sicilian palace, and the fourth act (save for a first interlude in the Bohemian palace) was completely outdoors in the Bohemian midsummer, with the final act taking place back in Leontes’ palace. Civilization vs. Nature, court vs. rural. But I also noted that there was a fly in that particular ointment.

Here’s the fly…

Continue reading Indoor/Outdoor and out of my head

The Winter’s Tale: scattered opposites

In Shakespeare, you’re always going to find dichotomies, oppositions (you know, to be OR NOT to be), that’s not a question. Now, Macbeth is filled with verbal oppositions (so fair and foul a day, etc.). The Winter’s Tale, however, contains some incredible situational oppositions as well.

  • Court/Rural (civilization/nature || Sicilia/Bohemia)
  • Leontes/Polixenes
  • Death/Life
  • Artifice/Art

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The Bill / Shakespeare Project presents: This Week in Shakespeare news, for the week ending Monday, August 14th, 2017

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This week’s Shakespeare news review podcast includes government bans, too many accountants, and some more summer reviews. PLUS our usual recap of this week’s daily highlights in Shakespearean history.

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[EXPLICIT] Bawdiness in Winter: BYOD

[EXPLICIT CONTENT, ADULT LANGUAGE AND SOPHOMORIC SEX HUMOR AHEAD… SKIP IF EASILY OFFENDED.]

Eric Partridge, in his study of and dictionary for the bawdy in the Bard, Shakespeare’s Bawdy, has this to say about our play: “Cymbeline in many ways resembles The Winter’s Tale, which is slightly less bawdy but rather more sexual. They are of much the same quantitative order as All’s Well.” (Shakespeare’s Bawdy, Partridge, Eric. New York: Routledge Classics, 2001; page 58).

Well, All’s Well’s got some dirt, but isn’t that dirty. Cymbeline, pretty much the same…let’s see if Partridge is right.

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Genre, pivots, and order: The Winter’s Tale

Now, I don’t know how long it’s been, but as long as I can remember, I’ve thought/been told that the order of the last few plays by Shakespeare, all romances, goes Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest (with the fourth romance, Pericles, preceding Cymbeline’s predecessor, Coriolanus). But now I’m discovering that there are some dissenting views.

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Friday Non-Film Focus: The Two Gentlemen of Verona by Independent Shakespeare Company

It’s August and a Friday, which means a new summer blockbuster is being released… but honestly in all the business of the week, I haven’t a clue as to what’s opening…but that doesn’t matter. I’m here to talk about what does: Independent Shakespeare Company’s production of The Two Gentlemen of Verona, running through September 3 in Los Angeles’ Griffith Park…for FREE.

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The Bill / Shakespeare Project presents: This Week in Shakespeare news, for the week ending Monday, August 6th, 2017

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NOTE: This week’s news digest is text-only (no podcast)… 

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This week’s Shakespeare news review podcast includes Hiddleston and Branagh, Shylock and Othello, aging fairies, and reviews. PLUS our usual recap of this week’s daily highlights in Shakespearean history.

Continue reading The Bill / Shakespeare Project presents: This Week in Shakespeare news, for the week ending Monday, August 6th, 2017

Bill Walthall (UCLA '85 English), a former high school English, Shakespeare, and Drama teacher, will read and blog about each of Shakespeare's plays, from The Comedy of Errors through The Tempest.

The Bill / Shakespeare Project