Numbers: Midpoint (Clothes DON’T make the man, after all)

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at The Taming of the Shrew.
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Taming by the Numbers: overall

The Taming of the Shrew:

  • 2598 total lines; shorter than average play, longer than average comedy (average play: 2777; average comedy: 2424)… though the play is shorter than the average comedy, if we remove the Induction (2321 lines)
  • At 277 lines, the Induction is the longest “prologue” scene in the Canon
  • Act One: 808 lines; longer than average, longer than average comedy (average play: 590, average comedy: 488)… though shorter than the average, if we remove the Induction (531 lines)
  • Act Two: 412 lines; shorter than average, shorter than average comedy (average play: 568, average comedy: 495)
  • Act Three: 343 lines; shorter than average, shorter than average comedy (average play: 576, average comedy: 512)
  • Act Four: 699 lines; longer than average, longer than average comedy (average play: 563, average comedy: 460)
  • Act Five: 336 lines; shorter than average, shorter than average comedy (average play: 480, average comedy: 471)
  • 541 lines of prose (only 20.82% of total lines [as opposed to The Comedy of Errors: 13.31% and Titus Andronicus: 1.39%])
  • 102 rhyming lines (only 3.93% of total lines [as opposed to The Comedy of Errors: 20.10% and Titus Andronicus: 2.42%])
  • 13 scenes; fewer than average (average play: 21; average tragedy: 16)
  • 4 disguises; Lucentio/Cambio, Tranio/Lucentio, Hortensio/Litio, Pedant/Vincentio (five, if you count Sly/Lord)

Bawdy, Part Two

Whoops.

This entry rated R… cover the kiddies’ eyes…

It seems that when I did the discussion of the wooing scene from The Taming of the Shrew (Act Two, Scene One, lines 169-281) a couple of days back, I forgot to deal with the bawdy aspects (like I said I was going to in the the original “Bawdy, Body, Who’s got the Bawdy?” entry).

So here we go…
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Podcast 13: The Taming of the Shrew Production Concepts

This week’s podcast includes some possible casts and production concepts for The Taming of the Shrew, a recap of this week’s blog entries, and  our monthly casting contest.

Notes:
The NY Shakespeare Production with Meryl Streep and Raul Julia–wooing scene

The “Great Performances” Production with Marc Singer and Fredi Olster–wooing scene
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The Wooing Scene

Every month, we like to take a look at one scene or speech in terms of scansion, and see how the meter gives clues to the director and actors for performance.  This month, let’s examine the wooing scene in The Taming of the Shrew–Act Two, Scene One, lines 169-281.
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Chicks, Man

Brits have been calling attractive women (read: “maidens”) by the fowl reference “bird” since around 1300 (Oxford English Dictionary Second Edition on CD-ROM [v. 4.0]).  Since Shakespeare wrote The Taming of the Shrew at some point decidedly AFTER 1300 (he wasn’t born until 1564), we might expect a little avian diction to pop up occasionally in the play, right?
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Role of Women

Yesterday, we discussed marital and legal matters when it comes to women.  Today, let’s just look the general role of women during the Elizabethan era.
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Elizabethan Marital/Gender Legality

OK, we’ve only glossed over this so far in this month’s discussion of The Taming of the Shrew… but let’s take a couple of days and discuss matters of Elizabethan marital and gender legality, and the role of women during Shakespeare’s day.
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