Titus Andronicus: A History of Violence [INFOGRAPHIC]

As I’m out of town this weekend, I don’t have a lot of time to write, but I do have time to release a new infographic on my Teachers Pay Teachers page! And what screams new infographic like a bit o’ the ol’ ultraviolence, right?

And what says ultraviolence more than Titus Andronicus

 

Continue reading “Titus Andronicus: A History of Violence [INFOGRAPHIC]”

Titus Andronicus: A History of Violence

After Good Tickle Brain‘s brilliant Mya Gosling released her Titus Andronicus death clock, it got me thinking what a Titus timeline might look like. While hers definitely conveys the over-the-top-to-the-point-of-nervous-laughter-ness of Titus Andronicus, I thought she had left off a few things.

I don’t have her artistic flair, but mine’s got more death (and rape)…

Titus Andronicus: A History of Violence (jpeg; thumbnail)

[download the pdf (507 kb)]

My Gossip, Report

The Merchant of Venice is a play about Shylock. Wrong. But that’s what people think.

Shylock is an evil Jew. Well, maybe. But that’s certainly what people IN the play say.
Continue reading “My Gossip, Report”

Brother, Can You Lend Me a Hand (or two)?

Funny thing.  While sifting through The Third Part of Henry the Sixth on a second go, I found a couple of references to hands that hearken back to Titus Andronicus and its use (and abuse) of limbs.  If you remember Titus, Lavinia’s rapists cut off her hands (as well as her tongue) to prevent her from implicating them.  Later, under a false offer to release Titus’ two imprisoned sons, Titus, his brother Marcus, and Titus’ other son Lucius, all offer to cut off their hands to win the release.  Titus sacrifices his hand to the villain Aaron, but wins no release of his sons.

As in Titus, the references here also refer to mutilation, and here specifically self-mutilation.
Continue reading “Brother, Can You Lend Me a Hand (or two)?”

Attend the Tale of Bill Walthall (or Sweeney Todd, or Titus Andronicus)

As we end the bloodbath that is Titus Andronicus, as we end our second month of our three-year journey, I want to thank all of you.
Continue reading “Attend the Tale of Bill Walthall (or Sweeney Todd, or Titus Andronicus)”

Podcast 10: Titus Andronicus Production Concepts

This week’s podcast includes a proposed casting for a production of  Titus Andronicus, as well as a couple of production concepts.  Also, our monthly casting contest.

Links:

Continue reading “Podcast 10: Titus Andronicus Production Concepts”

Fathers and Sons (and Mother and Sons… and Father and Daughter)

A little over a week ago, we discussed the concept of brotherhood in Titus Andronicus (to no real conclusion, if memory serves).  Today, let’s take a look at another kind of familial relationship: parent and child.
Continue reading “Fathers and Sons (and Mother and Sons… and Father and Daughter)”

Bodies Stacked Like Cord Wood

first an apology: I’ve been thinking about this concept now for a couple of weeks… but I don’t have time to do the topic justice… the following blog entry begins promisingly, but it turns pretty scattershot pretty quickly… if I get a chance to edit this and make it better, I will.  But for now, it’s all I’ve got…

In Hamlet, we’re told that the flesh is heir to a thousand natural shocks.  But in Titus Andronicus, there are myriad un-natural ones, too.  Rape. Tongue cut out.  Hands cut off.  Men sacrificed.  Children killed then baked into pies and fed to their mother.  Villains buried chest deep and left to die.  It’s an existence filled with pain and distress.  How can man cause such pain to his fellow man? (and here, I’m talking about the characters, not Shakespeare)
Continue reading “Bodies Stacked Like Cord Wood”

Titus by the numbers

Titus Andronicus:

  • 2522 total lines; shorter than average play, shorter than average tragedy (average play: 2777; average tragedy: 2890)
  • At 498 lines, I.1 is the longest opening scene in the Canon (of course, there’s only scene in the first act)
    • Act One: 498 lines; shorter than average, shorter than average tragedy (average play: 590, average tragedy: 647)
    • Act Two: 524 lines; shorter than average, shorter than average tragedy (average play: 568, average tragedy: 573)
    • Act Three: 385 lines; shorter than average, shorter than average tragedy (average play: 576, average tragedy: 633)
    • Act Four: 545 lines; shorter than average, shorter than average tragedy (average play: 563, average tragedy: 555)
    • Act Five: 570 lines; longer than average, shorter than average tragedy (average play: 480, average tragedy: 465)
  • 35 lines of prose (only 1.39% of total lines [as opposed to The Comedy of Errors: 13.31%])
  • 61 rhyming lines (only 2.42% of total lines [as opposed to The Comedy of Errors: 20.10%])
  • 14 scenes; fewer than average (average play: 21; average tragedy: 23)
  • 15 Deaths are a result of the play
    • before the play: 21 of Titus’ sons (not sure how many coffins are brought in for this final trip)
    • on-stage: 9 (Mutius, Bassianus, Nurse, Chiron, Demetrius, Lavinia, Tamora, Titus, Saturninus)
    • off-stage: 5 (Alarbus, Quintus, Martius, the midwife [assumed], the Clown
    • after play: 1 Aaron