Category Archives: Antony and Cleopatra

Podcast 138: Antony and Cleopatra: Concept, cast, and conclusion

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This week’s podcast concludes our three month-long discussion of Antony and Cleopatra with a production concept and cast, then a wrap-up of the play.

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Midpoint–enter Octavia then pivot

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Antony and Cleopatra.

There are 3039 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1520, or at Act Three, Scene Six, line 37. According to Dr. Rodes’ theory, you could find at this midpoint–or within twenty lines either way–a speech that perfectly sums up a major theme of the play (the 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions).

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Antony and Cleopatra: stage directions in dialogue

With every play, I like to take a look at the stage direction that are hidden in the dialogue. Shakespeare’s (in)famous for a dearth of explicit stage directions, forcing the enterprising actor/director to plumb the dialogue lines in search of some helpful nuggets. And thus my occasional sojourns into script studies. Antony and Cleopatra is no different.

Only it is.

Lemme ‘splain…

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Podcast 137: Antony and Cleopatra: Bawdy and the Barge [EXPLICIT]

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[WARNING: The the first portion of the following podcast contains adult language, sexual imagery, and stuff to make you say, “Man, that’s a dirty play.” You HAVE been warned. SKIP TO THE 15:30 MARK IF  EASILY OFFENDED.]

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This week’s podcast continues our three month-long discussion of Antony and Cleopatra with a quick look at bawdy in the play, then a look at Enobarbus’ “the barge” speech.

Continue reading Podcast 137: Antony and Cleopatra: Bawdy and the Barge [EXPLICIT]

O, Pretty Woman…

So, I’ve been thinking (as is my wont as I near the end of the discussion of a play) about Antony and Cleopatra, and the pervading view of women (or woman) in the play.

This is by no means as misogynistic a play as Troilus and Cressida (as we’ve noted before and before and before and before yet again). But it’s not exactly one that reveres (or even respects) woman. And please, don’t give me the “but Cleopatra is one of the greatest female roles in Shakespeare blah blah blah” argument. I’ll grant you she has a huge role in the play. She’s part of our dual (and dueling) tragic heroes. But women as a whole?

Continue reading O, Pretty Woman…