Category Archives: midpoint

Coriolanus: a sword-pull at the point of no return

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Coriolanus.

There are 3323 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1662, or at Act Three, Scene One, line 224. According to Dr. Rodes’ theory, you could find at this midpoint–or within twenty lines either way–a speech that perfectly sums up a major theme of the play (the 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions).

Continue reading Coriolanus: a sword-pull at the point of no return

Pericles – midpoint: huh?

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Pericles.

There are 2329 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1165, or at Act Three, Scene Two, line 5. According to Dr. Rodes’ theory, you could find at this midpoint–or within twenty lines either way–a speech that perfectly sums up a major theme of the play (the 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions).

Continue reading Pericles – midpoint: huh?

Midpoint: A midpoint without Timon

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Timon of Athens.

There are 2308 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1154, or at Act Three, Scene Five, line 45. According to Dr. Rodes’ theory, you could find at this midpoint–or within twenty lines either way–a speech that perfectly sums up a major theme of the play (the 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions).

Continue reading Midpoint: A midpoint without Timon

Midpoint–enter Octavia then pivot

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Antony and Cleopatra.

There are 3039 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1520, or at Act Three, Scene Six, line 37. According to Dr. Rodes’ theory, you could find at this midpoint–or within twenty lines either way–a speech that perfectly sums up a major theme of the play (the 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions).

Continue reading Midpoint–enter Octavia then pivot

Macbeth: midpoint(s) to the confined heart of the matter

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Macbeth.

There are 2162 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1081, or at Act Three, Scene Four, line 46. According to Dr. Rodes’ theory, you could find at this midpoint (or within twenty lines either way) a speech that perfectly sums up a major theme of the play. The 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions.

Only there’s another issue at play here…

Continue reading Macbeth: midpoint(s) to the confined heart of the matter

King Lear: mind-blowing midpoint

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at King Lear.

There are 2960 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1480, or at Act Two, Scene Four, line 285. According to Dr. Rodes’ theory, you could find at this midpoint (or within twenty lines either way) a speech that perfectly sums up a major theme of the play. The 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions.

This midpoint takes place toward the end of the scene at Gloucester’s estate when Lear has arrived, attempts to complain about Goneril to the visiting Regan, only to have the sisters team up against him.

Continue reading King Lear: mind-blowing midpoint

Othello: midpoint microcosm

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Othello.

There are 3237 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1619, or at Act Three, Scene Three, line 188. According to Dr. Rodes’ theory, you could find at this midpoint (or within twenty lines either way) a speech that perfectly sums up a major theme of the play. The 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions. Of course, with only 19% of this play in prose, wiggle room may not be needed.

Continue reading Othello: midpoint microcosm

Measure for Measure: midpoint, midpoint

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Measure for Measure.

There are 2594 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1297, or at Act Three, Scene One, line 191. According to Dr. Rodes’ theory, you could find at this midpoint (or within twenty lines either way) a speech that perfectly sums up a major theme of the play. The 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions. Of course, with over 40% of this play in prose, we may need to expand that leeway.

Continue reading Measure for Measure: midpoint, midpoint

All’s Well That Ends Well – Pivot Point

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at All’s Well That Ends Well.

There are 2807 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1404, or at Act Three, Scene Two, line 104. According to Dr. Rodes’ theory, you could find at this midpoint (or within twenty lines either way) a speech that perfectly sums up a major theme of the play. The 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions; and since All’s Well That Ends Well has over 48% of its lines in prose (I mean, that’s almost half, people), I’m a little concerned this forty-line window may not be enough. Let’s find out…

Continue reading All’s Well That Ends Well – Pivot Point

The heart of Hamlet: the play

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Hamlet.

There are 3728 lines in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1864, or at Act Three, Scene Two, line 161. Now, Rodes’ theory postulated that you could find at the midpoint (or within twenty lines either way) a speech that perfectly summed up the major theme of the play. The 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions. Of course, given Hamlet’s amount of prose (a solid 27%) and its notorious differences between quarto and folio releases, you’ve got to wonder if this theory still works, or if there will be something rotten in the texts of Denmark.

Continue reading The heart of Hamlet: the play

Twelfth Night: midpoint

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Twelfth Night.

There are 2462 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1231, or at Act Three, Scene One, line 65. Now, Rodes’ theory postulated that you could find (within twenty lines either way) a speech that perfectly summed up the major theme of the play. The 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions; and in a play with as much prose as Twelfth Night (63% of the lines are prose), this forty-line window seems to be all the more important.

Continue reading Twelfth Night: midpoint

Much Ado About Nothing: midpoint

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Much Ado About Nothing.

There are 2633 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1317, or at Act Three, Scene Three, line 9. Now, Rodes’ theory postulated that you could find (within twenty lines either way) a speech that perfectly summed up the major theme of the play. The 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions; in a play with as much prose as Much Ado (77% of the lines are prose; only The Merry Wives of Windsor has more prose), this forty-line window is all the more important.

Continue reading Much Ado About Nothing: midpoint

As You Like It: Midpoint

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at As You Like It.

There are 2678 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1339, or at Act Three, Scene Two, line 213. This is the scene where everything regarding the Rosalind/Orlando relationship (and I mean just about EVERYthing) starts to come together: Orlando begins to hang poetry, Rosalind finds poetry, Celia finds more than poetry, and Orlando finds Ganymede.

Continue reading As You Like It: Midpoint