All posts by Bill Walthall

After graduating from UCLA with a degree in English and a teaching credential, Bill Walthall returned to his hometown in Ventura County, California, to teach English and drama at Oxnard and Hueneme High Schools. Having spent a decade in the classroom, he took a year off to recharge his batteries, but was pulled into the private-sector rat race as a technology consultant. In the last handful of years, however, he has rekindled his passion for literature and education. He launched his blog, The Bill / Shakespeare Project, where he brings not only a fun, accessible yet still scholarly approach to a play-by-play analysis of Shakespeare’s works, but also the latest and greatest in Willy Shakespeare headlines every week in his “This Week in Shakespeare” podcast.

Pericles – midpoint: huh?

Using Professor Rodes’ midpoint theory, let’s take a look at Pericles.

There are 2329 lines in in the play, which means the midpoint is at line 1165, or at Act Three, Scene Two, line 5. According to Dr. Rodes’ theory, you could find at this midpoint–or within twenty lines either way–a speech that perfectly sums up a major theme of the play (the 20-line leeway was to help remove the differences in prose line lengths between individual editions).

Continue reading Pericles – midpoint: huh?

Speech Study: Gower, opening chorus

The play-opening chorus of Pericles, spoken by Gower, runs 42 lines, mostly in iambic tetrameter. Those are four-foot lines, as opposed to the five-foot iambic pentameter we’re used to hearing come from Shakespeare; of course, the historical Gower wrote in tetrameter, so it fits.

The speech in interesting as it introduces the play and Gower…but not Pericles. He’s not mentioned a single time in the speech, one that spends almost its entire length on Antioch and Antiochus.

And that’s not the only weirdness in the speech…

Continue reading Speech Study: Gower, opening chorus

The Bill / Shakespeare Project presents: This Week in Shakespeare news, for the week ending Monday, February 20th, 2017

[archive]

twitter_TWIS4
This week’s Shakespeare news review includes love, a doomed love story, neo-nazis, and grumpy old men. PLUS our usual recap of this week’s daily highlights in Shakespearean history.

Continue reading The Bill / Shakespeare Project presents: This Week in Shakespeare news, for the week ending Monday, February 20th, 2017

The Bill / Shakespeare Project presents: This Week in Shakespeare news, for the week ending Monday, February 13th, 2017

[archive]

twitter_TWIS4
This week’s Shakespeare news review includes politics, an all-female Henry VI, season announcements, and a rescue dog. PLUS our usual recap of this week’s daily highlights in Shakespearean history.

Continue reading The Bill / Shakespeare Project presents: This Week in Shakespeare news, for the week ending Monday, February 13th, 2017

Happy (pre-)Valentine’s Day–Pericles: bawdy or just ‘unsavory’?

Happy (pre-) Valentine’s Day! and in that spirit…

[EXPLICIT CONTENT, ADULT LANGUAGE AND SOPHOMORIC SEX HUMOR AHEAD… SKIP IF EASILY OFFENDED.]

So. Pericles and the bawdy. Given that Act Four takes place mostly in a brothel, you know it’s going to bring the bawdy. But what does our Bard of the Bawdy, Eric Partridge say in his Shakespeare’s Bawdy?

Continue reading Happy (pre-)Valentine’s Day–Pericles: bawdy or just ‘unsavory’?

Podcast 145: Interview Special — Melissa Chalsma and David Melville of Independent Shakespeare Co.

[archive]

This week’s podcast breaks from Pericles, with the first part of an interview with the founders of the Independent Shakespeare Co., Melissa Chalsma and David Melville, plus a little shameless self-promotion.

[a mea culpa: I took my bare-bones recording rig down to LA (iPad and Blue Yeti microphone). Now the mic’s pretty damned sensitive, so any move of (or it seems around) the table on which I placed the mic, gives us some soft thudding sounds. So I apologize for that; next time, I’m taking the full rig (boom mic stand and whole bit). I cannot apologize, however, for the occasional sounds of the LA Metro rumbling nearby (man, those trains are loud).]

Continue reading Podcast 145: Interview Special — Melissa Chalsma and David Melville of Independent Shakespeare Co.