Win an Autographed (!) Copy of Shakespeare for Kids: Julius Caesar, signed by editor Brendan Kelso

A couple of days back, I reviewed Shakespeare for Kids: Julius Caesar, edited by Brendan P. Kelso. It’s a fine, fun piece of work, something you will want if you have kids, either personally or professionally (as a teacher).

So, how would you like a copy, autographed by Kelso?

Playing with Plays presents Shakespeare's Julius Caesar for Kids (edited by Brendan P. Kelso)
Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar for Kids (thanks to its editor Brendan P. Kelso providing a review copy!)

I think I can make that happen…

Here’s how:

Let me know about the best production/version/adaptation you’ve ever seen of this month’s play, Julius Caesar. Give me the basic W’s: when and where was it, who was in it, and–most important of all–what made it so good.

Drop it into the comment thread below… I’ll read ‘em all in the last podcast for Julius Caesar, and the first of the New Year on January 4, 2015. I’ll pick the best (in my own humble opinion), and if it’s yours, then you get the book!

Submission deadline is midnight, Wednesday, December 31… good luck (and win a great book)!

One thought on “Win an Autographed (!) Copy of Shakespeare for Kids: Julius Caesar, signed by editor Brendan Kelso”

  1. The very best production of “Julius Caesar” I’ve ever seen was a high school production at a military all boys boarding school in the gym in 2008. [I say this immodestly, as I directed said production]. To peak the interest of boys who thought acting was for ‘sissies’ we set the show in modern time. The costuming came from their closets.
    I staged the battles to come from the back of the house, up the aisles with others jumping from the stage. We were able to enlist the drum corps [which was considered more ‘macho’] to play at appropriate intervals. To raise anticipation/expectations ever higher we held auditions for local female students for the few female parts.
    The students in the audience, gagged and groaned over the stabbings, cheered for the fights and became engrossed. A triumph!

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